CentOS 6.4 Netinstall

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.
Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.
When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.4/os/i386

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.4/os/x86_64

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CentOS 6.3 NetInstall

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.

Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.

When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.3/os/i386

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.3/os/x86_64


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Add Gnome/Gui to a Minimal CentOS 6.3 Linux System

I recently used the netinstall CentOS CD to install one of my Linux systems. During the installation process, I decided to install CentOS 6.3 minimal to quiken the overall install process. After the successful installation, I decided it was time to add Gnome/GUI to the system. The following were the steps taken to achive this task.

First, it is worth mentioning that there are two versions of this installation.

a.) Short version

b.) Long version

 

STEPS:

a. ) Short version:

Start a new terminal and enter the following:

yum -y groupinstall basic-desktop basic-platform x11 fonts

b.) Long version:

yum -y install “Desktop” “Desktop Platform” “X Window System” “Fonts”

 

That’s it! It will work regardless the method used ;-)


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HowTo Disable the “ZEROCONF” in Linux

Most linux distribution uses the zero configuration network ( ZEROCONF) suite to automatically configure themselves and communicate on a network without the need of DHCP or DNS servers. ZEROCONF is an IETF organ that planned and coordinated a series of dynamic protocols to allow many operating systems to automatically configure themselves.

 

ZEROCONF commonly referred to as IPv4 Link-Local (IPv4LL) and Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) utilises the 169.254.0.0/16 network address to auto-configure a network interface. It uses a series of unanswered “ARP” queries and then assumes an address if the queries yield an empty result. As a result, a route to the ZEROCONF network is added to the routing table by the network initscripts. Example:

The ZEROCONF route

ZEROCONF can be disabled by adding the following entry to the “/etc/sysconfig/network” configuration file.

 

[bash] # vi /etc/sysconfig/network
NOZEROCONF=yes or no (either answer will disable the “ZEROCONF route”)

It is important to note that the value of the “NOZEROCONF” parameter can actually be set to any value. The initscripts can only check to determine whether the parameter has a zero length or not. In other words, setting “NOZEROCONF=no” will have the same effect as setting it to “yes”. In order to reactivate ZEROCONF, the above entry “NOZEROCONF=yes/no” will have to either be commented out or removed entirely.

The network service must be restarted for the changes above to take effect.

[bash] # vi /etc/init.d/network restart

To see if the ZEROCONF route has been disabled, we have to check the routing table again.

The IP routing table

If you ever wonder and want to know more about the the makeup and history of the ZEROCONF, check this very informative zeroconf article written by John C. Welch and this zeroconf article on wikipadia.


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How to Create a Swap File

A swap file is an ordinary file that is in noway special to the kernel. The purpose of the swap file is to reserve the disk space so that the kernel can quickly swap out a page without having to go through all the things that are necessary when allocating a disk sector to a file.Because a hole in a file means that there are no disk sectors allocated (for that place in the file), it is not good for the kernel to try to use them.

In order to create the swap file without holes, use the following command:

1.) Assuming we want to create a swap file with 2GB size (1024 x 1024 x 2 = 2097152).

[bash]# dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile bs=1024 count=2097152

     where if is source, of is output file for dd to write to which is /swapfile in this case, bs is read/write byte size at a time and count is number of blocks.

2.) The next step is to make it a swap file

[bash]# mkswap /swapfile

3.) Activate the swap file

[bash]# swapon /swapfile

4.) Check the newly created swap space usinf free or top

[bash]# free -m

     or 

[bash]# top

5.) Write it to fstab to make it available for the system even after a reboot

[bash]# echo swapfile swap swap defaults 0 0 >> /etc/fstab

 

**) Using cat give you the following output:

[bash]# cat /etc/fstab
/swapfile1 swap swap defaults 0 0

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CentOS 5.8 NetInstall

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.

Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.

When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.8/os/i386

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.8/os/x86_64


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CentOS 5.4 NetInstall

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.

Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.

When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.4/os/i386/

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/5.4/os/x86_64/


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How To Mount NTFS disks on CentOS

Type this command to determine your kernel version:

[root@lnx ~]# uname -r
2.6.18-128.el5

Download the NTFS kernel modules from:

http://www.linux-ntfs.org/doku.php?id=redhat:rhel5

The current kernel module version of my system at the time of this writing was:
kernel-module-ntfs-2.6.18-128.el5-2.1.27-0.rr.10.11.i686.rpm

Install the RPM :

rpm -ihv kernel-module-ntfs-2.6.18-128.el5-2.1.27-0.rr.10.11.i686.rpm

 

Load the kernel module :

modprobe ntfs

 

Find the disk info : fdisk -l

One partition should be mentionned as HPFS/NTFS

 

Mount the partition :

mkdir /g_drive

mount -t ntfs /dev/hdb2 /g_drive

That’s it!


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