I sometimes want to monitor the progress of a copy or backup job on the console. The trick to do that is as follows:

while true; do something…; sleep 10; clear; done;

example:

[tom@ns2 ~]# while true; do df- h /media/usr; sleep 10; clear; done;

 

What this is, it display the size of /usr partition, the used space, available space and the progress of the job in percentage. The “clear” command will make sure all these informations are shown on a single line by clearing the screen. The clear command is very cool ;-)

It hope someone find this useful 

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.
Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.
When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.4/os/i386

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.4/os/x86_64
Written on May 4th, 2013 , CentOS, Linux, Linux Installation, Recent Posts

Download the network installation iso file and burn to CD.

Place the CD in the CD-Rom and reboot the system.

When ask to select the network install method, choose “HTTP” and enter the following:

1) for 32 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.3/os/i386

2) for 64 Bit
Host: mirror.centos.org
Directory: centos/6.3/os/x86_64

Written on November 13th, 2012 , CentOS, Linux, Linux Installation, Recent Posts

I recently used the netinstall CentOS CD to install one of my Linux systems. During the installation process, I decided to install CentOS 6.3 minimal to quiken the overall install process. After the successful installation, I decided it was time to add Gnome/GUI to the system. The following were the steps taken to achive this task.

First, it is worth mentioning that there are two versions of this installation.

a.) Short version

b.) Long version

 

STEPS:

a. ) Short version:

Start a new terminal and enter the following:

yum -y groupinstall basic-desktop basic-platform x11 fonts

b.) Long version:

yum -y install “Desktop” “Desktop Platform” “X Window System” “Fonts”

 

That’s it! It will work regardless the method used ;-)

Written on November 10th, 2012 , CentOS, Linux, Linux Installation, Recent Posts

 

Intro

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server using samba share as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 (or higher) client

CUPS

CUPS – Common Unix Printing System is a modular printing system for unixlike computer operating system which allows a computer to act as a print-server. A computer running CUPS is a host that accept print jobs from client computers, process them and send them to the appropriate printers.

CUPS was initially developed by a guy called Michael Sweet and the protocol used back then was LPD. Due to LPD limitations and vendors incompactibility, it was replaced with IPP (internet printing protocol). CUPS was quickly adopted by various linux distributions as the default printing system. Notable among them were Red Hat Linux, Fedora, SuSE, Mandrake and in March 2002, Apple joined (using CUPS as printing system for Mac OS X 10.2). In February 2007, Apple hired chief developer Michael Sweet and purchased CUPS source code.

Now, let’s proceed with the step-bystep installing and configuring CUPS

Step #1 – Install cups service

a.) # su -

b.) # yum -y install cups

Step #2 – Configuration

a.) # vi /etc/cups/cupsd.conf

The default CUPS configuration limits access only to the local machine (cups server). If you wish to open up the access, edit /etc/cups/cupsd.conf and comment out the following lines:

Order deny, allow

Deny from all

Allow from 127.0.0.1

b.) #vi /etc/cups/cupsd.conf

I’m not sure if this is advicable but if you wish to avoid password authentication, you need to edit and comment out the following lines:

AuthType Basic

AuthClass System

These lines above restrict the printer access to system users.

Step #3 – Restart the CUPS server

# service cups restart

To be continued…

Written on July 21st, 2011 , CentOS, CUPS, Linux, samba

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